L’homme aux yeux à facettes
L’homme aux yeux à facettes
Author:
吳明益
Translator:
Gwennaël Gaffric(關首奇)
Publisher/Year:
Stock, 2014
ISBN:
978-2-234-07472-9
Les Lignes de navigation du sommeil
Les Lignes de navigation du sommeil
Author:
吳明益 Wu Ming-yi
Translator:
Gwennaël Gaffric
Publisher/Year:
巴黎:友豐書店,2012
ISBN:
978-2842795580
Pages:
411
Introduction:
Badai (1962 - ), an indigenous Taiwanese from the Puyuma tribe, was born in Beinan Township in Taidong County, whose Mandarin name is Lin Er-lang. After junior high school he entered the military academy and served as a professional soldier until his retirement in 2006. In 2005, he obtained a master's degree from Graduate Institute of Taiwan Culture at National University of Tainan. He currently serves as vice-president of the Taiwan Indigenous Literary Writers’ Association. In 2002, his novel Ginger Road was given the Award for Taiwanese Indigenous Peoples Literary Reportages. His first novel Flute Stork: the Daba 69 Tribe in the Taishō Years, published in 2007, was awarded the 2008 Gold Prize for Longer Novels in the Taiwan Literary Awards. Daba Village 69 Tribal Stories (Tamarakau Story) in two volumes, Flute Stork and Horses and Railways also appeared in Japanese translation. Badai’s novels often take historical incidents as their themes. Based on his library and field research, and depicting events in his characteristic elaborate style, Badai creates literary works from an indigenous perspective and with the sense of historical reconstruction. The translator Uozumi Etsuko has translated many works in the realm of Taiwanese indigenous history and literature.
Les Survivants
Les Survivants
Author:
舞鶴 Wu He
Translator:
Esther Lin-Rosolato, Emmanuelle Péchenart
Publisher/Year:
Actes Sud,2011
ISBN:
978-2-7427-9800-1
Pages:
295
Introduction:
Chen Kuo-cheng, born in 1951 and known by his pen name Wu He, is often considered as “odd” in Taiwanese literary circle. Wu He once retreated himself in Danshui, reading a great quantity of books for 10 years. After his retreat Wu He published several books including The bone collector and Remains of Life. The background of Remains of Life is the “Musha incident” which took place in 1931 at Nantou, Taiwan. During the winters of 1997 and 1998, Wu He stayed at Qingliu village, where it was called Chuanzhongdao, to live with survivors from “Musha incident” and compose his book Remains of Life. Wu He once said there are three purposes of writing Remains of Life. First, it is to search for the legitimacy and justness of “Musha incident”. Second, it reveals a girl’s journey in search of ancestral spirits. Third, it describes the survivors and their remains of life when Wu He was conducting research in the village. There is only one long paragraph in Remains of Life, which is also Wu He’s very first French edition published in June, 2011.